Aboriginal Science & Knowledge

THE waters of the Bardi Jawi Indigenous Protection Area (IPA), 160km north of Broome, are paradise for seagrass: warm water, lots of light and a pristine, protected environment means these seagrasses grow fast, so why are they so short?

THE widespread use of cars and easy access to diesel fuel have been credited with prompting certain traditional desert Aborigines to stop making bread in favour of utilising new hunting grounds full of game.

AN ARCHAEOLOGIST dating Kimberley stone tools says the region’s most sophisticated stone technology, known as Kimberley points, appeared just 1,000 years ago.

CENTRAL Kimberley rock art from the period of first Aboriginal–European contact shows iconography dramatically different to both pre-contact art and contact art from other districts.

A PhD candidate and Indigenous rangers are working to train wild goannas to avoid eating toxic cane toads (Bufo marinus).

AN INTER-disciplinary team has used a new technique known as plasma oxidation to produce radio carbon dates for paint fragments as small as 10 micrograms in width.

PALAEONTOLOGISTS are using a range of old and new techniques to map the Broome Sandstone dinosaur trackways.

PURPOSLEY sharpened or ‘retouched’ stone axes evolved in Australia thousands of years before they appeared in Europe according to researchers studying the south-east Asian archaeological record.

shorebirdbook MaxineCharlieYAWURU language teacher, Maxine Charlie, remembers as a child seeing large flocks of Bar-tailed Godwits flying over the foreshore of Roebuck Bay when camping with her family.

Waterhole KimberleyAN INTER-disciplinary team has been developing a model to assess the likely ecological consequences of changing water-management practices in the central Kimberley.

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