Aboriginal Science & Knowledge

ANTHROPOLOGICAL and historical research with Aboriginal artists and Traditional Owners along the Canning Stock Route has illustrated the importance of dreamtime stories as carriers of important ecological knowledge.

To celebrate NAIDOC Week, ScienceNetwork WA invited a number of local scientists to talk about the science within Indigenous culture, heritage and communities. Today, Telethon Kids Institute researcher Dr Clair Scrine explores the effect of resilience on health in Indigenous communities.

To celebrate NAIDOC Week, ScienceNetwork WA invited a number of local scientists to talk about the science within Indigenous culture, heritage and communities. Today, Viviene Brown from The University of Western Australia explores the cultural importance of archaeological research in the Weld Range. 

To celebrate NAIDOC Week, ScienceNetwork WA invited a number of local scientists to talk about the science within Indigenous culture, heritage and communities. Today, Reader in Kimberley Rock Art Sven Ouzman explores one of the world's greatest art treasures, through the Rock Art Dating Project.

To celebrate NAIDOC Week, ScienceNetwork WA invited a number of local scientists to talk about the science within Indigenous culture, heritage and communities. Today, Curtin University Radio Astronomy Professor Steven Tingay explores the Ilgarijiri Project which explores Indigenous and non-indigenous perspectives of the universe.

LINGUISTICS and genetics have been used to prove that the boab tree (Adansonia gregorii) was spread through the Kimberley by ancient Aboriginal peoples.

THE waters of the Bardi Jawi Indigenous Protection Area (IPA), 160km north of Broome, are paradise for seagrass: warm water, lots of light and a pristine, protected environment means these seagrasses grow fast, so why are they so short?

THE widespread use of cars and easy access to diesel fuel have been credited with prompting certain traditional desert Aborigines to stop making bread in favour of utilising new hunting grounds full of game.

AN ARCHAEOLOGIST dating Kimberley stone tools says the region’s most sophisticated stone technology, known as Kimberley points, appeared just 1,000 years ago.

CENTRAL Kimberley rock art from the period of first Aboriginal–European contact shows iconography dramatically different to both pre-contact art and contact art from other districts.

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